Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Mahasatipatthana Sutta (4)

III. Cittanupassana (Contemplation on the Mind)

And how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu dwell perceiving again and again the mind (citta) as just the mind (not mine, not I, not self but just a phenomenon)?

Here (in this teaching), bhikkhus, when a mind with greed (raga) note55 arises, a bhikkhu knows, "This is a mind with greed"; or when a mind without greed note56 arises, he knows, "This is a mind without greed"; when a mind with anger (dosa) note57" arises, he knows, "This is a mind with anger"; or when a mind without anger note58 arises, he knows, "This is a mind without anger"; when a mind with delusion (moha) note59 arises, he knows, "This is a mind with delusion"; or when a mind without delusion note60 arises, he knows, "This is a mind without delusion"; or when a lazy, slothful mind (samkhittacitta) note61 arises, he knows, "This is a lazy, slothful mind"; or when a distracted mind (vikkhittacitta) note62 arises, he knows, "This is a distracted mind"; or when a developed mind (mahagattacitta) note63 arises, he knows, "This is a developed mind"; or when an undeveloped mind (amahagattacitta) note64 arises, he knows, "This is an undeveloped mind"; or when an inferior mind (sauttaracitta) note65 arises, he knows, "This is an inferior mind"; or when a superior mind (anuttaracitta) note66 arises, he knows, "This is a superior mind"; or when a concentrated mind (samahitacitta) note67arises, he knows, "This is a concentrated mind"; or when an unconcentrated mind (asamahitacitta) note68 arises, he knows, "This is an unconcentrated mind''; or when a mind temporarily free from defilements (vimutticitta) note69 arises, he knows, "This is a mind temporarily free from defilements"; or when a mind not free from defilements (avimutticitta) arises, he knows, "This is a mind not free from defilements".

Thus he dwells perceiving again and again the mind as just the mind (not mine, not I, not self but just a phenomenon) in himself; or he dwells perceiving again and again the mind as just the mind in others; or he dwells perceiving again and again the mind as just the mind in both himself and in others. He dwells perceiving again and again the cause and the actual appearing of the mind; or he dwells perceiving again and again the cause and the actual dissolution of the mind; or he dwells perceiving again and again both the actual appearing and dissolution of the mind with their causes. note70 To summarize, he is firmly mindful of the fact that only the mind exists (not a soul, self or I). That mindfulness is just for gaining insight (vipassana) and mindfulness progressively. Being detached from craving and wrong views he dwells without clinging to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, in this way a bhikkhu dwells perceiving again and again the mind as just the mind.

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Notes

55. Greed (raga) does not just mean strong passion but refers to the whole range of lust, craving, and attachment to sense pleasures from the weakest sensual desire to the strongest lust. It can produce only unwholesome actions.

56. The mind without greed is the wholesome opposite of greed and is the cause of renunciation, generosity, charity, and giving.

57. Anger (dosa) always occurs together with mental pain (domanassa). Therefore, if mental pain is present the meditator should know that anger is also present. Aversion, ill-will, frustration, fear, and sadness are all included in this term. Anger can produce only unwholesome actions.

58. The mind without anger is the wholesome opposite of anger and is the cause of loving-kindness (metta), friendliness, and goodwill.

59. Delusion (moha) is the mental concomitant that clouds and blinds the mind making it unable to discern between right and wrong actions, unable to perceive the characteristics of impermanence, unsatisfactoriness, and soullessness, and unable to perceive the Four Noble Truths. It is common to all unwholesome types of consciousness but here it refers specifically to those types of consciousness associated with doubt, uncertainty, restlessness, distraction, and confusion.

60. The mind without delusion is the wholesome opposite of delusion. It is the wisdom that perceives the impermanent, unsatisfactory and soulless nature of conditioned phenomena, perceives the Four Noble Truths, and is able to discern between right and wrong actions.
Greed, anger, delusion and their opposites all have a wide range of intensity from weak to strong. In insight meditation it is important to be aware of whatever is present in the mind no matter how weak or strong it appears to be.

61. This is the shrunken mind that is lethargic, indolent, and lacks interest in anything.

62. A diffused, restless state of mind that goes here and there is therefore not concentrated.

63. The type of mind experienced in the råpa jhanas and aråpa jhanas.

64. The mind as generally found in the sensuous (kamavacara) realms (i.e. without jhanas).

65. As above (Note 64.)

66. The rupa jhanas and arupa jhanas. Amongst these two the aråpa jhanas are superior to the råpa jhanas.

67. The mind with either proximate concentration (upacara samadhi) or absorption concentration (appana samadhi). A meditator who has no experience of jhana will not need to be mindful of the concentrated mind, the superior mind or the developed mind.

68. The mind without proximate or absorption concentration.

69. The mind temporarily free from defilements due to insight or jhana. There are ten defilements (kilesa), namely: greed, anger, delusion, conceit, wrong views, doubt, sloth, distraction, lack of moral shame, lack of moral dread (lobho, doso, moho, mano, ditthi, vicikiccha, thinam, uddhacam, ahirikam, anottapam).

70. The causes of the appearing and the dissolution of the mind are the existence or non-existence of ignorance of the Four Noble Truths, craving, kamma, body and mind (nama and råpa).

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